Leenna Naidoo

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    Leenna Naidoo
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    I do a bit of both.
    I re-read what I’ve recently written, correcting any lines and details and adding anything I feel would help the flow, then I get on with the rest of it. It usually means I don’t have a lot of rewriting or ‘patching’ to do. And often I’ll take a break to research something so I get the idea done right first time.
    But, I’m also finding that reworking my first couple of novels is easier now than it was a few years ago. I’m not so attached to the characters and that particular way of storytelling, so it’s easier to make significant edits and I’m more open to changing the order of scenes.
    I think my revision process, like my writing process, will change as I grow as a writer. So, I’ll do whatever works for now.
    I tried NanoWriMo once, but it didn’t work for me. The idea of rewriting all those words again into something more coherent seems like too much work! Though with StoryShop, I might give a try again, maybe…
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    Leenna Naidoo
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    Good to know. Thanks!
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    Leenna Naidoo
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    Hi Matt

    Thanks for taking the time to reply and adding to my knowledge 🙂

    • Mostly played on grass, in the winter, so softer pitches and harder to run – also less knee injuries because not played on AstroTurf etc.

    • More flowing game, it doesn’t stop, and many fewer substitutes – therefore more tired players!

    • Only Captains can talk to refs, so respect is high priority.

    • Lots of the players in teams then play with each other at international level – so they know each other well.

    Interesting, about the grass and having fewer knee injuries. I know it’s a winter game, but I didn’t think further than that. I’m just realising that it’s a very sociable game off-field.
    Also interesting to know that everyone is likely to know/know of each other. That would make for good point of tension in a story.

    Still haven’t gotten very far with this short story. But I must finish it now!

    Thanks again for your time and input. Much appreciated!

    Leena

     

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    Leenna Naidoo
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    For romantic suspense or action/adventure, I would re-read Mary Stewart and Alistair MacLean. I grew up reading them and their plots and pacing are still some of the best I’ve ever seen.

    For fantasy, Terry Pratchett and Diana Wynne Jones would be the ultimate fun and inspiration with maybe a little bit of Alan Dean Foster and some Stasheff, maybe. And if I’m in the mood, then Margaret Mahy, too.

    For scifi, I’d probably reach for Harry Harrison, Heinlein and a good anthology from the 80s and 90s when scifi seemed more fun than now.

    And I’d watch a good movie in the genre, too.

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    Leenna Naidoo
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    I start small then let the world suggest itself. I tend to write more magic realism, so I often use our world to springboard into new ones. I fear if I started a world without characters, I would never get down to writing! That said, the realities I write about have set rules, and I find that more useful than building up localities first.
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    Leenna Naidoo
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    Awesome! Thanks so, so much Benjamin. You’ve given me so much to process and lots of potential story conflicts to weave in.

    And thanks for being open to more questions on rugby. I may take you up on it later. And for all things quidditch, if ever need 😀

    As for AFL, again, I haven’t watched a game–only watched a little for some research and heard family talk about. But my Perth family are now just a likely to go to an AFL game as to cricket. I’m such a black sheep.

    Thanks again, and have a great weekend!

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    Leenna Naidoo
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    [email protected]: …I’ve also reffed and I wrote my master’s thesis on rugby (connecting it to mass communications), so I like to think I know a thing or two about the sport haha

    Wow! I feel like I’ve hit the jackpot. Thanks so much for taking the time to reply.

    I believe there are more injuries (perhaps more head injuries, in particular) in American football than in rugby. …Slamming into their torso isn’t a great way to stop them, but wrapping up their legs is. It’s a different technique than American football, but more effective (from a completely biased point of view, of course).

    Ah, so the tackle with wrapping up their legs and dragging makes sense, and also explains that odd (and quite funny, I think but that’s just me) dragging someone down like a slowly toppling cake. I see why you say there might be few injuries in rugby than in American Football, less impact to vital organs, right?

    One of the things I love most about rugby is the culture attached to it. Traditionally (although this is fading in some countries, i.e. USA and Canada), there is a profound silence in the stadium when kickers line up for their conversion or penalty kick. 

    I haven’t yet watched a full game on TV, but I do remember some of the footage from the 1995 World Cup, which most South Africans do. I always thought it had to do with it being the nail-biting end to the game or something. This is very interesting information.

    Likewise, there is a certain sportsmanship inherent in the game that is difficult to find elsewhere, except perhaps quidditch and ultimate Frisbee (both of which I have also played. Yes, quidditch is a thing haha).

    Really? Is it like curling, only with more broomsticks (sorry, couldn’t resist).

    Fans are polite and respect each other and the players. When I played, we would all–our team and the opposing team–gather for food and refreshments after the game, mingling and talking about not just the match, but other things in life. It’s a unique aspect of the sport, one of which I love. Also, when the ref pulls out a red or yellow card, or otherwise gives a player a talking to, the only thing (generally) coming out of the guilty player’s mouth is, “Yes, sir.” No dramatics. It’s wonderful.

    Cool! This is also very useful. Is the respect drilled in at practise? Do teammates frown upon a player who doesn’t respect a ref?

    People do tend to think the sport is one of the more violent sports out there, and while it can produce some wonderful injuries, it is relatively safe. Having played as a forward in the second row of the scrum (number 4) …There is a lot of pushing and grunting and other fierce-sounding noises emanating  from  the players, but the ref is there to, among other things, make sure the game is being played in a safe manner.

    That’s reassuring to know.

    Rugby players are tough as nails. …Often, players will pop their own dislocated shoulder back into place, or wrap up a damage wrist, or whatever, and come back out and finish the game.

    This sounds crazy. Why would you keep on playing when you’re injured? Why not substitute?

    I could go on forever about rugby, but I’ll stop here. If you have any other questions, please ask away. I’ve hit the “notify me” button, so I’ll be alerted to any replies 🙂  Good luck with the story, and let me know how else I can be of service!

    This is all excellent, Benjamin, and I really appreciate it. It’s given me much greater insight and lots of ideas to mull.
    And thanks for your generous offer to answer more questions. If you don’t mind, I’d like to take advantage of it now. I’ve recently watched some vids about steroid use in Welsh rugby clubs, and did some research on steroids. I know that it would be illegal for players to use steroids at National level and it’s crazy to think that someone would endanger their physical and mental health just to be on a team. Any thoughts on this? And do you think a player may be tempted or feel pressured to take steroids or other enhancers?

    Thanks again! If I can return the favour, I will 🙂

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    Leenna Naidoo
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    [email protected]: I’m a bit of an outsider to most sports.

    Me, too!

    I thought I could share my impression of Rugby as a non-biased individual. I am an american housewife/homemaker, but I have heard of Rugby. Not sure from where.

    This is great to know, because as a romance story going into an anthology, it’s meant to appeal all romance writers, and most romance sales come from North American, it appears.

    My uneducated opinion is that it is a more violent and possibly more athletic version of American Football. Rugby players also appear to be in better shape physically. American Footballers tend to be a bit tubby looking. It might be there uniforms, but hey. As an author I have researched injuries on several occasions, and Rugby players come up a lot in those searches. Possibly a coincidence. I think that is about all I know on the subject. I hope it helps. I’m very interested in reading the future responses to this question as well.

    I also had a the perception of it being one of the most violent team-sports out there, but I’m not sure about it being more violent than American Football. But it would appear that AF players have better protection against injuries. My brother tells me that Aussie Football is even more rough being some kind of hybrid of rugby and AF, but I don’t know much about it.

    Thanks so much for your reply, Sherry. It’s a great help. And I’m glad this question is of interest to you as well. It makes me feel less like a sore thumb sticking out. Best of luck with your own research and writing!

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